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we handle drug enforcement here in california is in effect a war on crumbs instead of the often used phrase on drugs. how do you respond to his remarks? >> well, i think the first thing that we have to recognize is that the majority of people who are caught up in the criminal justice system and who are prosecuted for this type of offense for possession offenses and to some degree possession for sale offenses, the vast majority are indigent people and the vast majority of those indigent people are people of color. so what you have are two systems in place. you have a system where privileged white middle class people basically use drugs, college campuses, frat parties, not clubs, they use drug with impunity, they don't have to worry about being caught. then you have a system that comes down like a ton of bricks on indigent poor people and that's one of the reasons why i think this type of reform is a positive first step because if you aren't going to make drug possession illegal, at least make it a misdemeanor and not a felony. at least don't stigmatize and label an entire population o
us. and so, i think that once again, i go back to the fact that under the current system, because we have so many of those individuals who were once incarcerated at the state level, being pushed down to the counties, there's no room at the end in terms of the county jails. so misdemeanors aren't going to be sentenced to county jail but will be sentenced in community service or whatever. and for those individuals who do need some measure of control and supervision to deal about -- deal with their conviction problems, it's not going to happen at the misdemeanor level. >> let me go to a couple of the questions from the audience. i've shared them with our district attorney. george, two questions there, one related to whether or not drug possession should be treated differently for adults than from juveniles. and then a question about back on track, whether or not that program would be positively or adversely affected by senator leno's proposal. >> yes, let me start with the first question concerning juveniles. i think juveniles definitely need to be treated differently, and certainly her
's wrong with that? [ticking] >> when the u.s. oil companies came here in the '40s and '50s, the americans moved into the area with their families and developed it to suit their tastes and their way of life. they created a replica of american suburbia. today you could be in the outskirts of houston or los angeles. it's almost like it's an enclave within saudi arabia. it's--different from the rest of the country. >> yes, that's true, because-- >> very different. it kept a lot of the american ways. >> yes, of course. >> but blocked off from the rest. >> they are good ways. there's nothing wrong with it. these were their excellent ways. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm morley safer. in this edition, we follow the flow of big oil from massive, mega billion dollar oil fields in saudi arabia to the u.s. where wall street refines the oil into a mega billion dollar commodity. we begin with a look back to 2008 when the price of oil, theoretically tied to supply and demand, suddenly became untethered. storage tanks were full, yet the price skyrocketed from $69 a barrel to nearly $150 before it
for those poor little whatevers that are difrplt than us, but we are all equal. the third one is working together and i think about the giants, we're all for the team, not all together not as if we are color blind and color doesn't exist but with our diversity. the fourth is with power and authority, the person who stands up and says this is what needs to happen, like a school principal who says we're not going to let kids go around the school saying that's okay, all these things are needed. >> i like that, that's great. something that really resonated with me that tom said, if you simply tolerate diversity you are aspiring to mediocrity. can you talk about the ambassadors, adults taking an active role to intervene when we witness bullying. >> all of us are humbled by the virus, how systemic it's become. how do you get your hands around that? for me it's top down and bottom up. we are authority figures and what we do for our children and that's care, but we need to empower them to become the leaders they are waiting to become. this notion of youth adult partnership is esoteric in its
now. - fox and friends begins right now. >> we'll use juliet. >> she does the turkey call. >> 16 years of it >> my kids had their first twinkie they said oh, my goodness. we have missed this. and now they don't want the twirchingy to go away. >> have they tried the zinger. ngood point. >> sorry son it is going away. it is thanksgiving. many of you are getting up my wife is geth house ready for thanksgiving. >> we have mother-in-law. >> had a thanksgiving emergency. cynthia was late, she was really on time. delayed a bit because she had a fire in her oven. she had to call the police and fire department. >> and they - on yeah. >> she put the turkey on before work and boom, the stove goes up. >> it was not like she was going. here i am going to work. here's the turkey. nthis happens. nthere is a lot of issues that come up on this day and that's why we are here for you. prospect of preparing your thanksgiving turkey is worrying you. forenot. we have experts. she has a business card that said that. nicole jobs is here to answer your questions. hi, nicole. better to span the gamit from the r
us? we been halted by the long, but this time of what to document every step of the way. one of my triplet sons was taken out of football because of concussions years ago. now knowing what i know, the game can be made safer. the game is being made safer. so very quickly what we did is we parachuted into oklahoma. we've been following 18 for the entire season. we started in february at each monthly visit them for a week. we've been filming them. their concussion rate has plummeted to we put together our risk management program, 15 different steps. we have a celeron matters, hit sensors on their helmet at the high school level, so we are tracking heads. we are tracking everything that these boys walk we been able to get them. no helmets, not just a correct fit but how to measure it. most import message i have is that the kids want these ether and their helmet or as an earbud or mouthpiece. they want that responsibility taken away from themselves. so right now they are underreported and this this is really helping. >> let me bring bill maher to this conversation. as we mentioned as an
shows distribution, most of us in here. you get anybody out here who is externalizing or anyone out here who is internalizing, as a psychologist, we try to bring them back in here so they're more healthy. that's what we study. when you're having problems in your life or any other area, if we can do something, talking to you versus talk therapy or medicine that might help you, what we're trying to do is get everybody back here so we're just kind of more balanced. with respect to the traumatic brain injuries and other types of things, that's much simpler for people to kind of understand that you had a concussive event or you had a t.b.i., traumatic brain injury, that's caused problems. we should be developing ways of helping to manage and treat those problems just like we do individuals who have the other types of problems. >> let me just add one thing there, which is it's a good question, but it highlights one of the challenges of introducing neuroscience today in the courtroom. at kent showed you some of his slides and mentioned during his talk, he is trying to develop treatments as he d
for us to commit resources as a city is really important. and what i understand of this item is that there is a discussion about whether or not to tie the funding that's underlying this item to the rainy day fund. and to the extent that happens, to the extent that there is a connection between this appropriation and the rainy day fund, i will not support it. the rainy day fund was created for the very purpose of this city making public education a priority. the rainy day fund, as was enacted by the board of supervisors, as was crafted by then supervisor ammiano has to stand on its own terms, it has its own triggers, its own mechanisms for deciding what exactly the school district gets. and to the extent that we are trying to use this supplemental appropriation as a09( #ta way of minimizing the amount given to the school district through the rainy day fund i have a problem with that. so to the extent that this item comes back to us in the form where it is tied to the rainy day fund, i will not be supporting it, and i would encourage parents and folks in the public school commu
of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, how do we want to account for that if at all in the criminal justice system? to date, we haven't. in the future, we may wish to. >> i agree with that. i think that, first of all, the fact that everybody in the audience could control themselve
i'm steve kroft. thanks for joining us. [ticking] [ticking] >> it is the mark of the yakuza: ornate, full-body tattoos that cover the members of the japanese mob. so how did one of their most notorious godfathers get into america and jump to the front of a line for a lifesaving liver transplant? this reporter found out and says it may cost him his life. >> as he was leaving and getting in his car, he said, "that"-- you know, "that--that goddamn american jew reporter. i want to kill him." [ticking] >> greg mortenson's book three cups of tea is a publishing phenomenon that has made him a celebrity, a cult-like figure on the lecture circuit, and inspired people to give nearly $60 million to his charity, and it all began with one simple story. >> it's a beautiful story, and it's a lie. >> we wanted to talk to mortenson about that and some other things, but he didn't want to talk to 60 minutes. >> steve kroft. >> nice to meet you. >> how you doing? >> thanks. >> got five minutes for us today? >> um... [ticking] >> we wondered how the man who could whistle up a corporate jet on a whim...
the show show. join us there. we'll have more recipes and the sale. >> a fox news alert, cheering and celebratory gunfire breaking out on the because saw strip -- gaza strip, residents there claiming victory. just hours now into a ceasefire that ends the worst fighting between israel and hamas in years, one gaza city resident saying the morning coffee even tastes different, feeling as if there's a brand new start. good morning and happy thanks giving, i'm gregg jarrett in for bill hemmer. >> and i'm iowansly err hart. secretary clinton is telling us the international community will do its to make things better for both sides. >> the united states will work with partners across the region to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. gregg: leland vittert is live in southern israel with the latest. leland? >> reporter: good morning, gregg. there's sort of a cold rain that has descended here on southern israel, but all is quiet on the southern front. the only sounds we are hearing is the tanks and the armored pers
brother is speaking out to us. nbc bay area in that courtroom as the suspect faced the judge for the first time today. >> reporter: well, raj, jonathan which will banks did not look very menacing in court today, but police say he is a cold-blooded killer, be and they are still looking for a second man who they say helped him. he lowered his head for most of the hearing. the lawyer for jonathan which will banks explained the posture outside the courtroom. >> i would say extremely remorseful. >> reporter: remorseful for what, sir? which will banks is charged with killing a carjacking victim and then going on a crime spree that ended in a shoot-out with san jose police. >> someone who would do something like this. >> reporter: in an exclusive interview, which will banks' younger brother couldn't answer if he thought which will banks was capable of such violence. eric which will banks says his family is torn and hoping for the best for the murder victim's family. >> we all need to unite and donate for the family. i don't know why this happened but that's the only way to make the situation bett
'm julie haener. police tell us, thanksgiving eve is one of the biggest party nights of the year. some refer to it as blackout wednesday. some officials say it is second only to new years for drunk driving violations. leave in petaluma, he found college students getting together for cocktails, and police getting together for a busy night. >> reporter: you can see behind me on this blackout wednesday, people are already out having a good time. we have a long ways to go. police are just hoping people don't party too much. >> these college age women are home for thanksgiving and are catching out over a drink called a swamp water. >> just back in town and hanging out. >> just a good feeling to come home. petaluma is a good town to come home to. >> the bars are just packed. i don't know why everyone wants to drink so much a night before eating a bunch of turkey. >> reporter: sometimes, the celebrations go too far. this was the scene two years ago. >> we had problems with bars overserving. young people, fights. you know, dui's. >> reporter: extra officers will be on the street tonight. polic
, everyone. i'm frank somerville. >> i'm julie haener. police tell us, thanksgiving eve is one of the biggest party nights of the year. some refer to it as blackout wednesday. some officials say it is second only to new years for drunk driving violations. leave in petaluma, he found college students getting together for cocktails, and police getting together for a busy night. >> reporter: you can see behind me on this blackout wednesday, people are already out having a good time. we have a long ways to go. police are just hoping people don't party too much. >> these college age women are home for thanksgiving and are catching out over a drink called a swamp water. >> just back in town and hanging out. >> just a good feeling to come home. petaluma is a good town to come home to. >> the bars are just packed. i don't know why everyone wants to drink so much a night before eating a bunch of turkey. >> reporter: sometimes, the celebrations go too far. this was the scene two years ago. >> we had problems with bars overserving. young people, fights. you know, dui's. >> reporter: extra officers will
for giving us this beautiful space to meet in today. is esther here? i haven't seen her. we'll thank her later. they made this space available for us. good morning, my name is me linda hague for those of you who don't know me. i was appointed by president obama a little more than two years ago to be united states attorney and it is my incredible honor to represent the president, the obama administration here in the northern district of california. welcome to the stop bullying summit. i'm a federal prosecutor so it may seem odd that here we are talking about bullying and we asked all of you to be here and i want to explain the origin of that and why this happened. you people, everybody in this room, has been involved in this issue and is doing incredible work on this issue and we were so honored to be a part of it and to meet with all of you and to speak with you about it. the origin is that as the united states attorney, the administration wants me, wants all the united states attorneys, to go out into the community. it's actually a very different role for the united states attorney
's become more of a hindrance than a help for most of us. so listen up, tonight setting you straight. here on "mad money" we're about long-term investing, often mischaracterized. there is a serious problem with this notion. it goes like this. too often people let the concept of long-term investing get in the way of investing. if you think long-term investing is about making boatloads of money over years, decade, each lifetimes, i'm on board, and that's something i can teach you how to do using the disciplines that allowed me to make fortunes for my already rich partners back in my old hedge fund where i ran a million dollars. however, i've seen people in long-term investing as an excuse, an alibi either for poor performance -- >> the house of pain! >> -- or for not paying attention to what they own. you often hear that you shouldn't worry about your losses or the profits that you're missing in the present, that it's okay to take short-term pain because you'll make back the money you're losing with long-term gains. sometimes absolutely true. but most of the time losing money month after mon
side is claiming victory as they honor a fallen leader killed in the eight-day conflict. >>> u.s. ambassador to the united nations, susan rice defends herself about comments about benghazi, responding directly to her harshest critics. >>> giving thanks following superstorm sandy. trying to lift the siepirits of those left with nothing. >>> plus this. >>> good morning to you. happy thanksgiving. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for spending at least part of your holiday with us. for the first time in more than a week, it has been a relatively quiet day across israel and fwa gaza. the cease fire is holding. at the border, israeli troops are packing up after spending one final night there. israeli forces says when the cease fire started, three rockets were fired into israel. two hit open areas and the third was intercepted by the iron dome missile defense system. if everything remains this relatively quiet until 2:00 eastern this afternoon, the gaza border crossings will open. rallies opened in the streets as they celebrated what they call a victory over israel. the prime minis
's district as well. i think many of us came into the work of public service to fulfill the government's mission in areas like this, to ensure that we are really protecting, defending our most vulnerable residents, and helping property owners to follow the law. and so this particular case of september 12 of this year, all the violations have been corrected and the building has been restored to a livable state for 48 families that reside on this property. so i want to take this time and acknowledge the members of our city family that actually make this happen. we can legislate law. we can talk about building code. but there are people that actually go out there and make that law reality for the residents here in san francisco. so i want to thank rosemary, james, james, david, and allen davidson. we want to recognize you today for your outstanding work protecting the basic living conditions of 48 san francisco families living at 245 leavenworth over the last three years. thank you for your leadership in abating 423 housing code+nc'p violations and restoring the building to a livable sta
in afghanistan as the u.s. military inches closer to the 2014 withdrawal deadline. it's been a load of fun to chang chang -- hang out with you. ainsley: happy thanksgiving to you and your families. rick: breaking news. >> the deadly fighting between israel and hamas stopped for now, but what will it take for the ceasefire to hold? we are live in jerusalem. >>> and ambassador susan rice publicly defending her earlier comments, calling the attack in libya that killed four american spontaneous. will it be enough for those opposed to her possible nomination for secretary of state? >>> and a very controversial new study about mammograms, questioning the value of the screenings. should you or shouldn't you get one? it's all "happening now." ♪ ♪ finish. rick: and we begin with hope for a new beginning in israel and gaza. so glad you're with us, everybody, i'm rick folbaum, in for jon scott. heather: and i'm heather childers in for jenna lee. it is a busy news day. the rocket fire and airstrikes stopped for now after more than a week of the worst cross-border fighting in four years. a ceasefir
been left behind who later come to the u.s. to be reunited with their parents and we don't talk about how immigration breaks out families and and, you know, it takes a toll on the whole family. so this is one of the reasons why i wanted to write about this because, you know, it's something that is -- it's an experience that definitely scared me, that has really shaped the woman i am today, and then also it's an experience that i think right now with the dreamers, you know, with the young undocumented people who are fighting to get their legal status, i felt it was an important story in terms of giving people an inside to what their situation might be like and i touch upon the fact that, you know, my family benefited from the amnesty of 1980, i had a green card by the time i was 14. so the moment i got my green card, you know, the whole world just opened up to me and there were so many possibilities that came my way that i was able to jump on because i had a green card. and i would really love to see this happen to the dreamers, you know, for us to give them that chance to pursue
of the last three weeks. one-and-a-half miles long. it's about the weight of a u.s. space station, and it's bigger than the weight of the empire state building. what we're looking at right now, around the clock 1800 garbage trucks have been moving in and out, bringing in debris. they have been going full tilt 247, even before the hurricane hit. well real looking at, they are using sand that was on the beach box that ended up from the flooding, using it as what are called berms to stop any hazardous waste from the losing end to the environment and the area, said that is the he -- the sand wall. they just switched on the lights they are looking at dump trucks and 18 wheeler's coming into my bringing in this debris. the president did you fly over when we were here this morning. he did give a shout out to the sanitation workers. they are the first responders that basically remove the debris. what we are hearing is the new york parks department gracefully open this up because if they did not build this landfill here, the rebuilt would have been even slower. right in the area, heartbreaking pho
tonight. make sure you go to gretawire.com. let us know who you thought about this special edition of "on the record". keep it here on fox news channel. good night. thanksgiving to all have a great weekend. >> bill: special edition of the o'reilly factor is on. tonight: >> the factor goes hollywood ♪ i love l.a. >> wayne was kind of like you he was an intimidator. >> me? >> sure. i think you would like him. >> what do guys like chilly ski grammar and chuck norris think about the state of the union right now. >> the democrats have gone further left and the republicans have gone to where the democrats were 40 years ago. >> bill: why have so many celebrities becoming so engaged in politics? >> the center is where we should be because all of us agree on a lot. >> is socialism the new craze among some pop celebrity icons. >> i am not a liberal. i was raised a socialist. my family is socialist. they were not liberals they were socialist. >> we collected some great hollywood interviews this evening and it all starts right now. >> once upon a time, you and i actually felt journalism was
becomes more important than ever. vigor us oversight of the health care law by the house can be expected and, in fact, is already under way. one of these things is not like the other. the courts and the presidential election process, they can actually stop obama care from happening. you get supreme court ruling against it, the president works to repeal it and that can matter. congressional oversight hearings? that is not an accepted avenue for repeal. it is actually a little pathetic. if you think john boehner has any chance of repealing the health care law through vigorous oversight from the house's oversight committees, what have they been doing for the past two years? why isn't it gone now? boehner is a realist. this is not wishful thinking on his part. it is lazy comforting and it is here, republicans, don't you worry, it is all part of the plan, we're on track, but there is no plan. the country is moving forward. it is moving forward regardless of the house republicans. on tuesday the department of health and human services issued new regulations that explained the health care law i
the president. even those that voted against us, most of them don't see us that way. so that is the problem. i think it's an underestimating of your opponent's strength and the reality of how people view them. d there was a ridicule that i think -- i don't fully understand the impact it played in the election but i know it played a deep impact. and listen, as i said, our party has gone through that before which was a disbelief that president bush could be re-elected in 2004. people saw it differently. >> i think there are a number of legitimate policy criticisms of president obama. and there are issue that is he's advanced in the country that i just disagree with. however, if you go back to mitt romney's book, what was the title. no apology. inferring that the president runs around the world apologizing for america. not true. that never happened. the birther nonsense t. attempts to delegitimate mies the president that he wasn't born in hawaii, that he is on alien impter in the oval office, the conspiracy began 20 years ago. all of this deranged nonsense had a terrible impact not on the preside
? >> the center is where we should be because all of us agree on a lot. >> is socialism the new craze among some pop celebrity icons. >> i am not a liberal. i was raised a socialist. my family is socialist. they were not liberals they were socialist. >> we collected some great hollywood interviews this evening and it all starts right now. >> once upon a time, you and i actually felt journalism was a calling. >> bill: i still think i'm doing something noble. [ laughter ] caution, you are about to intrer the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. hi, i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching the factor goes hollywood special. top story tonight. conservative hollywood. actors chuck norris, james con, kelsey grammer all have something to say about how things have changed in this country over the past few years. we begin with chuck norris. >> if we look to history, our great country and freedom are under attack. we're at a tipping point and quite possibly our country as we know it may be lost forever if we don't change the course our country is headed. >> bill: so you are saying, look, we are headed
want to show you. in november to the us and 8, do you think the country will be better off or worse off for years from now? -- in november 2008, do you think the country will be better off or worse off four years from now? 54% said better off. 41% said worse off. the pessimism has grown but overall americans are optimistic about the future and the next four years. that is what we want to ask you about. are you optimistic about america's future? of course, you can contact us via social media. our twitter handled is @cspanwj. another question that was asked in both 2008 and 2012 -- this year, 69% said americans are divided, 29% said united. a few more of those results. this is the percentage of americans who think it is extremely important that president obama accomplished the following. across the board, all americans in gray, democrats in blue, republicans in red. number three, for all americans, second for democrats, and four four republicans. make major cuts in federal spending came in at number 5 for all americans. those are some of the results of the poll that was taken november 9 t
of progress in a networked age" use the tere pure progressive. what iss that? >> guest: is my attempt to come up with a term for this new political philosophy that i seeo emerging all around me. e. the book is really kind of a series of stories about these people are trying to change ther world and trying to advance the cause of progress. ban but they don't completely fithei the existing models that we have between the left and the right or the democrats and right republicans. democrats and repub. they believe in many ways that the way the internet was built, the way the web was built, the way things that wikipedia were built, using these collaborative. the works, where people come together from different points of view and openly collaborating, building ideas, that that mechanism is a tremendous engine for progress and growth. but it doesn't necessarily involve a government and doesn't necessarily involve capitalism or big corporation. so when you believe in a system come you don't necessarily believe in the traditional anchors that the left are traditional anchors at the right. so i felt th
. >>> and all that matters. >> u.s. troops serving our country are being served thanksgiving dinner. >> thousands of miles away on "cbs this morning." >> from kabul, afghanistan -- happy thanksgiving! captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning" on this thanksgiving day. happy thanksgiving. norah o'donnell is off. we are waking up to good news out of the middle east. for the first time in more than a week the cease fire between israel and hamas held overnight and continues to hold at this hour. >> people in gaza and southern israel are leaving shelters and returning home after that week of air attacks across the border. hamas and its supporters inside gaza are claiming victory. charlie d'agata is in gaza city this morning. >> reporter: it's like being on a different planet in gaza city whole world away from what this place was like 24 hours ago. people are smiling, congratulating one another. we had to fight through traffic for the first time. and for the first time people here got a good night's sleep and woke up without the worry of israeli
their biggest investment, and 31 percent of us ill owing more than our home is worth, you may be wodering how we can possibly see a silver lining in the housing maket. you want more evidence? phoenix arizona, a market that was the poster child forr housig problems. the overbuilt domination leading foreclosure, entire neighborhoods abandoned and in disrepair. today prices are up 25% so far, and on tra to finish up 30%. to be sure that is not as big again as the decline, but the city is poised for real recovery the same story of recovery is playing out in miami, san francisco, san jose, seattle. big losers staging convincing turnaround. i think this may be the most important story of the year, and not when you're likely to hear much about. the media likes to avoid good news headlines. the headline, if it were written, would be, housing is the best opportunity for americans with ready cash. a strong recovery, lower intere rates, low prices. how you can make out like a bandit. that's a right to it. all-star panel. and michael lawson, research and will -- analyst. welcome all. we will start with you.
around the world. and you saw him during the 2012 u.s. campaign. he was campaign manager for the landslide reelection of california governor in 2006. before that a top political advice sor in the white house of george w. bush. he attended the university of delaware from 1988 to 1993. david plouffe crossed paths in schmidt in the late 1980's. he completed his political seasons degree and finned two years ago. he has completed two presidential bids. he was appointed as a senior advice sor to the president in the white house in 2011. he attended is the marks high school before serving in a wide viret of state and national political campaigns. i'm going to ask the two speakers this evening to speak and i had to decide who is going to go first and i decided to use a standard that anyone this this audience could mean and that is whoever has won the most recent presidential election gets to speak first. i think that's the fair enough thing to do so please welcome david plouffe and steve schmidt to the university of delaware. [applause] >> thank you for joining thus evening. it's
downtown, people are going encouraged to used the light rail to actually get here. all highway 87 ramps will remain open, and back out live, just to give you have an idea of just how huge this event it, the arch you're looking at, i'm told by organizers, that they've expanded that and 14,000 people will bass under that arch -- pass under that arch each minute. these people are motivated to dress up and try to win, because you can win airplane tickets, and tickets to the 49ers games that are coming up. so we will bring you more once this first race against underway at 7:45. that's the 10 k wheelchair rice. i-- race. >>> it is 7:07. police reopen westbound 580 in oakland after a wild freeway shoot-out forced a complete shut down of the busy freeway on thanksgiving eve. investigators say passengers in two cars fired shots at each other near the seminary avenue exit around 80:00 last night. one car was riddled with bullets, but passengers were gone by the time the police arrived. traffic was diverted for almost two hours, but all lanes were back open by 11:30 last night, and so far, no inju
double that residential neighborhood and create impact on traffic. i hope you will join us on this resolution. the rest i will submit. >> clerk calvillo: thank you. supervisorn%(olague. >> supervisor olague: are we going back to the -- >> president chiu: roll call. >> supervisor olague: i will submit. >> clerk calvillo: supervisor elsbernd. supervisor campos. >> supervisor campos: thank it is with a great deal of sadness that i do an in memorium or howard l. wallace and ask that we adjourn the meeting in his name. and i know that supervisor avalos and president chiu wanted supervisor olague, and it might be appropriate to do it on behalf of the board, the entire board. but howard wallace was simply an institution in san francisco, the labor community but also the lgbt community and so many communities that have been fighting for social justice. it is true that howard's sister's brothers in the queer labor and elder human rights movements had the sad duty to report his death on wednesday, november 14 at the beautiful -- vista manner in san francisco. he was a veteran of soci
,e jpvz mr. mayor. mr. mayor, with the november election behind us our federal delegation is contending with potentially significant budget sequestration. have you examined what some of the potential impacts of these cuts may be to the city programs and services, particularly those that serve the poor and those in federally subsidized housing? >> mayor lee: thank you, supervisor, for raising this important issue. while we recently avoided state trigger cuts with the passage of proposition 30 we're not out of the woods yet. we all need to focus very closely on the fiscal cliff and sequestration cuts that it includes. the impacts on san francisco could be devastating. until we have more clarity, what congress as a whole might or might not do we will need to remain vigilant about protecting our reserves and the city's financial position. that said i'm encouraged by the reelection of president obama and certainly for the leadership that leader pelosi has given and will continue to give. we will need their leadership as the president must quickly face the challenge of his second term, avoidi
a grant in the amount 400,000 from the u.s. department of environment, environmental protection to support brown fields assessment projects. >> president chiu: same house same call? this resolution is adopted. item 27. >> clerk calvillo: item 27 resolution authorizing the department of emergency management to retroactively accept and expend a fiscal year 2012 program grant in the amount of 29 million from the us department of homeland security through the california emergency management agency for the periods of october 12, 2012 through may 31, 2014. >> president chiu: same house same call, the resolution is adopted. >> clerk calvillo: item 28 a mast lease extension for the department of ha public health n mission street for approximately 32.36 million per month with annual increases. >> president chiu: same house same call, this resolution is adopted. next item. >> clerk calvillo: item 29 is a resolution authorizing the department of public health to retroactively accept and dispend a grant in the amount of approximately $197.1 to participate in a program monitoring project for the period
>> i hope you will join us for the reception in extension room 754 with speakers and many of you here and lastly in join me in thanking darlene nipper, and rebecca traister. [applause] .. >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. you can tweet us at booktv, comment on our facebook wall or send us an e-mail. nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> and now from the 17th annual texas book festival in austin, texas, a discussion of president lyndon johnson and first lady ladybird johnson. this is just over 50 minutes. >> hi, and welcome to the texas book festival.d my name is carol dawson, and iw love being a moderator every year at the texas book festival, and i particularly love this task this year. task this year i have had the privilege of reading two books that interlock so beautifully that it provided one hold 360-degree experience in reading them. before we begin, and i introduce our authors, i want to remind you all that all proceeds of book sales at the texas book festival goats the libraries of this great state. so, please avail yourself of the boo
the death of the victim. police sergeant told us so far in case does not appear to be related to the freeway shooting. >>> volunteers up early getting ready to serve thousands of thanksgiving meals. katie marzullo is live at glide memorial church in san francisco, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. happy thanksgiving to you and everybody. we are an hour from a lot of hustle and bustle in this room. you can see some of the prep has been set up for salad fixings, that's a side dish compared to everything on the menu today, 500 volunteers preparing 5,000 thanksgiving dinners. i want to introduce jean cooper a director here. most of us can barely get one dinner on the table today. how massive of an undertaking is this? >> it is pretty big, we are used to it now. it is a big deal. we start cooking early in the month then it goes to a high pitch during the week. we are ready to go now. >> reporter: a lot of prep work. >> oh yeah. we've got, we start planning in august. thanksgiving we start planning and get orders in and start cooking in mid month. >> reporter: there are thousands of familie
teachers and we used to call it in servicing, a lot of people think you wouldn't want to go to an in service. teachers are always hungry for stuff. i believe in the law enforcement community and the other convenient tues we're talking about, they are already there. they got the itch. with some leadership from the community or a faith organization or a parent i think it will actualize. >> the sunnyvale safety and police department have been really spectacular and have spearheaded this with officer holly lawrence. she has the program, it's in place, we call it train the trainer where we train other police officers to take it back to their counties. it's a spectacular program and is available now. >> so we don't have to wait. >> a good thing about the digital age is we're going to take some of the best practices, we're going to make it available. you get school officials to think how does this fit into the queue of things i did and should be doing, tlau our web site, focus of expertise and other places, indicate what are those programs that work that help students understan
't actually use the world cyber bullying. we talk about the behavior and there is tons of research we're doing in how people are behaving on our platform and the tools we can give them to resolve their issues and either through themselves and trusted audiences, et cetera, or turn to us and we don't use the term "cyber bullying" and we don't think about it's the technology. it's about the behavior itself and i know there is ongoing debate with that and cyber bullying captures people's attentions and everything i have learned from anne and the nonprofit community and the academic folks who have researched this when you use a term like "cyber bullying" you are diminishing the behavior and placing it on the technology. >> personally i hate it. it suggests robots and not humans at all. let's think about humanity, not technology. >> so i want to show you a couple of things and show you my version of a sizzle reel which is not sizzle and i am also mindful it's 4:00 o'clock on a friday so we are the last people between you and weekend, so let me say a couple of things. one is we built ou
at "red eye" can give special thanks to peta for continuing to supply us with endless topics we can discuss with our special brand of rye humor. gobble, gobble, guys. isn't it nice where facebook is so private and you can share photos and comments without consequences ? it is not? we will discuss. and finally, being fat can protect you from depression? well, what is protecting me? my ace in the hole, denial 1k3* repression. -- denial and repression. >> gobble, gobble indeedment i am here with fox business network liz mcdonald. author and screenwriter whose latest book came out earlier this month called "if we survive." bill schulz, he can't stop laughing right now and he thinks all taylor swift songs are about him. and next to me is jim norton. his special "please be offended" is now available on netflix. >>> is he making light of their plight? well, peta sent a let torte white house asking our newly elected president end the practice of pardoning a turkey. they prefer he killed them. actually they say it makes light of the mass slaughter of some 46 million gentle inteligent birds.
us live from tel aviv, israel, with those details. martin, good morning. >> reporter: hi, veronica, good morning. the cease-fire went into effect 9:00 in the evening last night. that's 17 hours ago. and so far, so good. there were two early this morning sirens in the south of israel, warning sirens of rockets. turned out, they were just false alarms, though, so it is holding for the time being. and also, the israeli army has just given orders about an hour or two ago for the first of the army reserve soldiers that it called up for a possible ground invasion of gaza. 30,000 reserve soldiers were called up. the first of those have been given orders now that they can return to their homes and to their jobs, and at the same time, they're keeping others on duty because there's still a great amount of skepticism about whether the cease-fire will hold. they hope that it will, of course, but some skepticism, so much so, for instance, that the schools of the area, all schools have been closed within a 40-kilometer distance of gaza for the last week. all of the kids staying at home, many of
for today. we also welcome our listening audience and we invite everyone to listen to us on line at commonwealth club.org. now it's my pleasure to introduce our distinguished speaker. marc freedman is ceo and founder of encore.org, a nonprofit organization working to promote encore careers. second acts for the greater good. he spearheaded the creation of the experience core, now one of america's largest nonprofit national service programs engaging people over 55. and the purpose prize, which annually provides five, 100,000-dollar prices to social innovators in the second half of life. freedman was described by "the new york times" as the voice of aging baby boomers who will are beginning retirement for meaningful and sustainable work later in life. while the work "wall street journal" stated, in the past decade, mr. freedman has emerged as a leading voice in discussions nationwide about the changing face of retirement. he is the author of the "the big shift" navigating the new stage beyond midlife, published in april of 2011 which "the new york times" called an imaginative work w
obama still hasn't given the green light to the keystone pipeline that would give us jobs and energy n independence? now a truly bipartisan group of senators is telling the president to make a decision right now. first up this evening, this is the big question. will we get a deal done or might president obama just let us go right over the fiscal cliff, take the recession, and simply blame the gop? this is a serious question that i'm hearing from washington all the time. so let's talk. we have cnbc contributor jack bernstein, former chief economist, and art laffer, former reagan adviser. i'm not attacking obama or anything. i'm just saying there is a lot of talk of stalemate. well perhaps go through where, why and how. staffs have been meeting unsuccessfully. some people are saying, art, that the scenario is going to be that president finally throws up his hands and says there is no deal, we're going to have a stalemate and we will tall off the fiscal cliff into recession and then he will blame the republicans. what's your take? >> i think he's going to blame the republicans, larry, for
they're adding a floor, residential occupancy or they're going to be changing use from garage residential, even a portion of, to give better guidance. * especially again, police and fire and building have to be coordinated in these reviews. so, like i said, it was a real good meeting. i know on item number 4, you have the overall umbrella permit for sprinklers, for sprinkler coverage for high-rise buildings. that is a great thing for helping expedite the programs. i know the director's staff has worked with fire, so, we're all on board with that and everything. it's nice to be here again and happy thanksgiving to you all, too. >> thank you. >>> good morning, commissioners. happy holidays. my name is robert davidson, i live in the bayview, 90 21 4. i'm here for [speaker not understood]. one is an emergency demolition order that was signed on august 7th for some properties on the corner of thornton and 3rd street in the bayview. properties are still there and i understand that the department is working on them. but we'd like to get the buildings knocked down. second item is 48
's not how any of us can afford to approach their jobs. i don't want to prosecute any more hate crimes cases. i want to be, for those of you over 50, remember that maytag commercial, the guy is sitting there waiting for that phone to ring? i want to be that room. i want to have nothing to do. i want to take my niece up on her offer to golf at the present side owe because i want to have time on my hands. but we see this headwind of intolerance that is a growth industry, i real estate gret to tell you. we see it manifested in our hate crimes practice, so many cases involving teenagers who have been recruited at a young age to desecrate mosques, to do so many other unspeakable things in communities across this country. so we have to get to work and we are, in fact, getting to work and i am so impressed at the partnerships that have been out here. i'm so impressed that we recognize that bullying is no longer simply the bullying of your fists but it's the bullying that can come through the use of twitter, through the use of other social media. we did a case, again a hate crimes case involvin
stevens. i'm the chair of sf dog. we support active recreational uses and adamantly oppose any move to give sharp park to [speaker not understood]. it is suing san francisco to try to force us to close the sharp park golf course and give it to the gg & a. the lawsuit is in the courts right now, but preliminary [speaker not understood]. this resolution will help their lawsuit. a cynical point by them to get you supervisors to do what they don't seem able to get the courts to do, to push their extremist plan to close sharp park golf course and give it to the [speaker not understood]. you shouldn't make it easier for people suing the city to win their lawsuit. stay out of it and vote no. you should not assert pressure on planning while an e-i-r is being developed. that is the intent to change the results of the nap e-i-r. don interfere and vote no on this resolution. the e-i-r in question is supposed to be for the natural area management plan, not just parts of it. you should not allow extremists with a stake in this to pick and choose which parts of the overall nap plan are considered
's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a usa today story and suicide and especially among veterans right now and suicide is complex and we cannot send the message -- there is a lot of fear out there right now that bullying leads to suicide and suic
. i am done. that was his turning point. call it a turning point, called the teachable moment. use whatever terminology that you want. that is where we need to be present. when i say we, i mean, we. at that turning point, at that moment of truth, that teachable moment, it is imperative that resources be brought to bear. now, what are the two most impressive resources that are brought to bear at that moment. there are two major forces that helped gang members change. one of them is tattoo removal. this is the first major force in the denunciation. the second is legal assistance. surprising. you did not see this on the video and i never thought of this. the first thing individuals need, not to feel like gang members -- is to erase their past. they have literally talked with me about feeling -- removing these tattoos and legal excitement. it is not that simple. changing from being a gang member to a former gang member involves a change in identity. this is a tricky process. it is slow and steady, and there is frustration. the gang is replaced with drugs, and there are fallbacks. relap
. and if we get customers to support us, walmart will listen. >> this nothing but another union-funded publicity stunt. >> reporter: walmart released a statement today. while protests are expected to take place at walmarts across the country, walmart insists its workers have among the best jobs in retail, and expect black friday to be a huge success. >> our more than 1.3 million associates enjoy working at walmart. they like the opportunities they get by look working at the company, and they're excited. >> walmart, walmart, you're no good! >> treat the workers like you should. >> reporter: but as they took their demonstration inside the store, chanting up and down the aisles, their claims seemed to resonate with at least some shoppers. this family pledged not to return until things improve. >> until they get treated rightfully, we're going to stand in their corner. >> reporter: again, protests are scheduled to take place across the country and across the bay area over the next couple of days. we are told protests will take place in san leandro, richmond, san francisco, and san j
to be at land use committee. >> can we -- i'd be happy to postpone, if you don't mind. >> supervisor elsbernd: that's not going on work. >> we're talking about 15 billion at stake. and i would rather not have it be rushed. >> supervisor elsbernd: and i agree but i have a lot of about on the points of disagreement. >> good. >> supervisor elsbernd: i don't want to waste time on points we all agree on. >> i think that it was said, in the pension fund response, that after 2015 the payments may decrease. this was a statement they made and we have an answer to that statement. did you want to look through and see that? because we disagree with that. >> supervisor elsbernd: president chiu and i are going to be voting on this resolution. he and i agree with that finding with that finding. you can move on to finding 4 which is also a finding that i think we agree with. >> i have to say i was concerned when you were the president of this hearing, or the chairman of this hearing because i know you are one of the people that we investigated. you were part of the board. and i was hoping you would be very i
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